Sir Thomas Munroe

In 1820, he was appointed governor of Madras, where he founded systems of revenue assessment and general administration which substantially persisted into the twentieth century. He is regarded as the father of the `Ryotwari system‘. His official minutes, published by Sir A. Arbuthnot, form a manual of experience and advice for the modern civilian. Munro was created a Baronet, of Lindertis in the County of Forfar, in 1825. He died of cholera on 6 July 1827 while on tour in the ceded districts, where his name is preserved by more than one memorial. An equestrian statue of him, by Francis Legatt Chantrey, stands in Madras city.[7]At his behest a Committee of public instruction was formed in 1826, which eventually lead to the formation of Presidency College.

Incidence in Mantralaya (Andhra Pradesh)

Mantralaya village in Andhra Pradesh is a place where `Brindavana‘ of famous `Dvaita‘ saint `Raghavendra Swami‘ is located. When Sir Thomas Munroe was the Collector of Bellary in 1800, the Madras Government ordered him to procure the entire income from the Math and Manthralaya village. When the Revenue officials were unable to comply with this order, Sir Thomas Munroe visited the Math for investigation. He removed his hat and shoes and entered the sacred precincts. Sri Raghavendraswamy emerged from the Brindavan and conversed with him for sometime, about the resumption of endowment. The Saint was visible and audible only to Munroe who received Manthraksha (god’s blessing). The Collector went back and wrote an order in favour of the Math and the village. This notification was published in the Madras Government Gazette in Chapter XI and page 213, with the caption “Manchali Adoni Taluka. This order is still preserved in Fort St. George and Manthralayam. This notification was published in the Madras Government Gazette in Chapter XI and page 213, with the caption “Manchali Adoni Taluka. This order is still preserved in Fort St. George and Manthralayam.[8][9]

Statue

Sculpted by Francis Chantrey, and sitting proud and straight on his horse, in the middle of Chennai’s famed Island, is The Stirrupless Majesty.[10] Either due to an oversight, or depicting his affinity for bareback riding, Sir Thomas Munro’s statue shows him without saddle and stirrup.[11] It has been recently reported that this statue will be removed.[12This pillar was erected by the British India’s Government of Madras to mark the association of Dharmapuri with SIR THOMAS MUNRO who lived here from April 1792 to March 1799 as Assistant to the Superintendent of Revenue in the BARAMAHAL. His house and his favourite garden where few yards away from this place.near at vel milk depot

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About sathiyanarayanan1947

Resident of Chennai in India, a retired Government officer, and doing freelance writing to various tamil magazines and English newspapers regularly. Suggesting ways and means for public oriented issues.
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